International bibliographic information on dietary supplements (IBIDS) database
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International bibliographic information on dietary supplements (IBIDS) database

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Published by National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements in Bethesda, Md .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Dietary supplements -- Databases.,
  • Herbals -- Databases.,
  • Minerals -- Databases.,
  • Nutrition -- Databases.,
  • Public health administration -- Databases.,
  • Vitamins -- Databases.,
  • Dietary Supplements -- Database.,
  • Dietary supplements -- Bibliography -- Databases.

Book details:

About the Edition

Database produced by the Office of Dietary Supplements of the National Institutes of Health, in conjunction with the Food and Nutrition Information Center of the National Agricultural Library, U.S. Department of Agriculture. IBIDS contains bibliographic records, including abstracts published in international scientific journals, on the topic of dietary supplements, including vitamins, minerals, and herbal and botanical supplements. The general public, scientists, and researchers can search the database using keywords and other parameters to obtain the citations of research journal articles.

Edition Notes

Other titlesNIH Office of Dietary Supplements IBIDS database
GenreDatabases., Database.
ContributionsNIH Office of Dietary Supplements., Food and Nutrition Information Center (U.S.)
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRM258.5
The Physical Object
FormatElectronic resource
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3385250M
LC Control Number2004564840
OCLC/WorldCa41079562

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In support of this mission the ODS created two databases one of which was named the International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) database. The other database, Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements (CARDS), is a database of federally funded research projects pertaining to dietary supplements. The IBIDS database was retired in and the PMDSS was launched to continue the ODS mission to disseminate dietary supplement-related . It established a program to improve analytical methodologies and develop standard reference preparations of dietary supplements and has created two databases that are publicly accessible: the Computer Access to Research on Dietary Supplements (CARDS) database and the International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) database. The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health will announce the launch of its new International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) database at a news media event on Wednesday, Jan. 6, , from 1 p.m. to p.m. at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. The PubMed Dietary Supplement Subset succeeded the International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) database, , which was a collaboration between the two U.S. government agencies, ODS and United States Department of Agriculture National Agricultural Library. Download free Acrobat Reader.

The International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements provides access to citations and abstracts from published, international, and scientific literature on dietary supplements. There is also a link to the Clinical Trials Database, which is a registry of federally and privately supported clinical trials conducted in the United States and worldwide. Resources and links for applications, forms, guidance, and other items of interest to industry members. Dietary Supplement Fact Sheets. The Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) fact sheets give a current overview of individual vitamins, minerals and other dietary supplements. ODS has fact sheets in two versions—Health Professional and Consumer. Both versions provide the same types of information but vary in the level of detail. Information on selected dietary supplement products, ingredients, and other substances. Information for Consumers Tips for dietary supplement users, including older supplement users.

Manufacturers of dietary supplements that contain new dietary ingredients (those ingredients not in use prior to the passage of DSHEA) must notify FDA at least 75 days before introducing the dietary supplement into interstate commerce and provide FDA with information that is the basis upon which the manufacturer has concluded that the dietary. IBIDS provides access to bibliographic citations and abstracts from published, international, scientific literature on dietary supplements. An additional resource for the research community and general public are evidence-based review reports commissioned through a partnership between ODS and NCCAM from AHRQ Evidence-Based Practice Centers. Dietary supplements may alter drug pharmacokinetics by influencing luminal conditions in the intestinal tract, the activity and/or expression of transporters and enzyme, and drug distribution. This chapter reviews the potential of herbal ingredients in dietary supplements to disrupt drug pharmacokinetics. International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements (IBIDS) Indexes to scholarly articles on dietary supplements from four major databases. - present.